Lt col dick cole. A last salute to a Raider: Air Force bids farewell to Lt. Col. Dick Cole

Doolittle Raiders' Lt. Col. Richard E. Cole dies

lt col dick cole

Thatcher, Horton, Cole and Griffin at the Alamo in San Antonio, 2006 Catherine Casey, Bernie, Ed's son-in-law, Dick Cole, Wes Fields and others at Ed Horton's funeral, Ft. Louis, Illinois, for training before arriving at Randolph Field, Texas and later, Kelly Field, Texas. They did everything they could to keep the Japanese from capturing our crews. Of the 80 Airmen committed to the raid, eight were captured by Japanese forces with five executed and three sent to prison where one died of malnutrition. On Tuesday, Goldfein recalled that ceremony. In 1938, he graduated from Steele High School in Dayton and attended two years of college at Ohio University before enlisting as an aviation cadet on Nov. Of the 80 men who flew the daring mission, two survive today.

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Lt. Col. Richard Cole

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We had to be airborne in 500 feet. He shot Cole a look, he recalled with a laugh. We were confined to base, in isolated barracks, and told not to talk about our training. Underway from San Francisco, they were informed of the plan to bomb. All excess equipment was taken out, like the Norden bombsight, the lower turret. The mission helped boost morale after the attack on.

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Memorial for Retired Lt. Col. Dick Cole: The Last of the Doolittle Raiders.

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Cole was a loving father and husband, Rich said. In news interviews, including ones given after his 100th birthday, Col. They thought they were friendly planes. Courtesy of Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio They reached Japan after a little more than four hours, flying at an altitude averaging roughly 200 feet, Cole said. He had never even practiced parachuting. And when future Navy Admiral Henry Miller started teaching them how to take off from a carrier, they guessed they were headed to the Pacific to take the fight to Japan. And when this raid happened, that terrified them.

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Lt. Col. Dick Cole, the Doolittle Raiders made history, planted the seeds for today’s Air Force > U.S. Air Force > Article Display

lt col dick cole

Under normal circumstances, a B-25 needed at least 3,000 feet to take off, but the group was trained to use only 500 feet. They had an air race there in which a captain lost his life. Naval History and Heritage Command But you launched early, on April 18. Then we started to get the B-25, which was really a kick in the air as far as flying. He was then buried with full military honors in. A memorial service for Cole was held at on April 18, the 77th anniversary of the Doolittle Raid. The Army Air Corps would end up with a squadron of B-25s and a commander.

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Lt. Col. Richard Cole

lt col dick cole

We think they thought we were one of their airplanes. Doolittle and co-pilot Cole would take off in the first aircraft. We took the engine covers off the plane, pulled the props through and went over the checklist. The stunned Japanese military diverted resources after a string of Pacific successes. When morning came he cut himself down and started walking west, away from the Japanese controlled region. They were going to hoist them onto the carrier Hornet, sail it out off the Japanese coast and launch them.

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Lt. Col. Dick Cole, the Doolittle Raiders made history, planted the seeds for today’s Air Force > U.S. Air Force > Article Display

lt col dick cole

He was 94 and the next-to-last survivor among the mission's 80 airmen. Cole said that Doolittle feared his audacious mission had failed, because all planes and some of his airmen were lost. From left to right: front row Lt. The family of retired Air Force Lt. Cole will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery, but a memorial service is planned to be held on April 18th at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph in Texas. Of the 80 men who took part in the raid, 77 survived the original mission.

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